Today's Top Stories

  • RITM okays COVId-19 testing laboratory for Northern Mindanao Medical Center

    RITM okays COVId-19 testing laboratory for Northern Mindanao Medical Center

    CAGAYAN DE ORO (MindaNews / 15 May) — The Research Institute for Tropical Medicine (RITM) has given the green light to the Northern Mindanao Medical  Center (NMMC) to start testing their medical laboratory for COVID-19.     Dr. Bernard Rocha, NMMC spokesperson, said  experts from RITM will arrive next week to evaluate the performance of their laboratory staff. “We secured our license just now and we are only waiting for the cartridges for the machine,” Rocha said, referring to the Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) machine, the gold standard for COVID-19 testing.     Rocha said their laboratory can operate for 12 hours and can process results up to 36 swab samples per day.     He said the results can be known in 30 to 45 minutes.     Rocha said there will be two medical equipment available to process the COVID-19 tests once the Department of Health regional office will finish the conversion of their tuberculosis testing laboratory.     The city government of Cagayan de Oro had also purchased three RT-PCR machines to augment the laboratory at the NMMC.     Once operational, the NMMC laboratory will be the first medical facility to process COVID-19 swab tests in Northern Mindanao.     At present, only the Southern Philippines Medical Center in Davao City has the capability to process the swab specimens from Mindanao’s 27 provinces and 33 cities. (Froilan Gallaro / MindaNews)

    May 18, 2020

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  • THE CAGAYAN DE ORO FILIPINO-CHINESE COMMUNITY

    THE CAGAYAN DE ORO FILIPINO-CHINESE COMMUNITY

    THE CAGAYAN DE ORO FILIPINO-CHINESE COMMUNITY turned over 500 sets COVID-19 Rapid Test Kits; 1,400 sets 4-layer Face Masks KN95; 2,500 sets 3-ply Non-woven Face Masks; and 200 bags of rice valued at P750, 000 to Mayor Oscar Moreno on May 16 as support for frontliners of the  Cagayan de Oro J R Borja General Hospital. (photo courtesy of Jeffrey Ang)

    May 18, 2020

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  • 75th Cagayan Liberation Anniversary Feature: Maj. Jose Manuel Corrales Montalvan,  1st Camp Commander of the ‘Kampo’

    75th Cagayan Liberation Anniversary Feature: Maj. Jose Manuel Corrales Montalvan, 1st Camp Commander of the ‘Kampo’

    Few Kagay-anons today are aware that the first camp commander of the Philippine Army’s biggest military camp in Mindanao was a Lumad (native Kagay-anon).     Major Jose Manuel Corrales Montalvan was initially assigned as Cadre Commander of the 2nd Misamis Oriental (Machine Gun) Cadre at Camp Bulua (present day Camp Edilberto Evangelista) in Cagayan, a post he served in from January 1-Dec. 31, 1939.      When the camp was renamed Camp Evangelista, then 1st Lt. Montalvan was appointed its Camp Commander and Mobilization Center Officer on January 1, 1940, a post he served up to the outbreak of World War II.      Dr. Montalvan, who was also known as Ñor Peping, was born on March 17, 1903 in present day Cagayan de Oro (then known as Cagayan de Misamis, capital town of the Segundo Distrito de Misamis, and later as Misamis, Cagayan under the American regime) to Jose Gabriel Montalvan, a retired Spanish soldier from Belmonte, Cuenca, Spain who was assigned by the Spanish government to the Philippines and Concepcion Corrales y Roa of Cagayan de Misamis.      In 1927, he was graduated with honors (3rd highest) from the Philippine Dental College, Manila with a degree of Doctor in Dental Surgery (DDS).     Upon his return to his hometown in 1928, he practiced dentistry and became one of the first teachers of the Ateneo de Cagayan (present day Xavier University) and was its Commandant of the Corps of Cadets. Dr. Montalvan was commissioned a first lieutenant in the U.S. Army Reserve in 1928, was trained and successfully completed the U.S. Army Extension Courses. From 1933 to 1937 he was the instructor for Military Science and Tactics at the Ateneo de Cagayan. However, the lure of a full-time career in the newly formed Philippine Army proved irresistible and he resigned from the U.S. Army Reserve and was commissioned as a First Lieutenant, Infantry Reserve, of the Philippine Army on July 16, 1936. He was called to active duty training at Camp Murphy Training School for Reserve Officers (Infantry), assigned as Company Commander of the training officers company, and graduated No. 5 with a general average of 90.7% in 1938. While assigned as the first camp commander of Camp Evangelista, he graduated from the School of Military Law and Courts-Martial Procedure, Camp Keithley, Lanao in 1940. Upon his induction into the U.S. Army Forces – Far East (USAFFE) on September 6, 1941, he was appointed Division Finance Officer and Division Quartermaster of the USAFEE’s 102nd Division. Later, he was appointed Division Inspector General, 102nd Division, USAFFE, with Headquarters at Tankulan, Manolo Fortich, Bukidnon then promoted to Captain, Infantry, in April, 1942. Following the surrender of the USAFFE forces in Mindanao under Gen. William Sharp to the Japanese Imperial Army on May 10, 1942, Dr. Montalvan was taken as a prisoner-of-war (POW) by the Japanese and detained at the Ateneo de Cagayan campus which had been converted into a POW Camp. “During his captivity he developed polyneuritis, which caused his leg to become shorter, as a result of the hard labor he underwent in prison when he and others would carry sacks of potatoes and coffee under the rain, soaking their only clothing in their bodies,” recalls his daughter Annabel Montalvan Corrales. “One night after such experience his whole body became numb and his leg started to give him extreme pain. The doctors at that time did not know what it was but was later diagnosed as polyneuritis.” However, he successfully escaped and joined his family in Talakag, Bukidnon. He walked for days to Talakag, away from the road, because the Japanese were looking for him. Again, the rains came and soaked his clothes. When he got to Talakag he had very high fever and the polyneuritis he contracted became worse. He then proceeded to Misamis Occidental to join the guerrillas of Col. Wendell Fertig, commander of the United States Forces in the Philippines (USFIP) in Mindanao, which was made up of escaped prisoners-of-war and Filipino and American soldiers and civilians who refused to surrender to the Japanese. Between 1942 and 1944, USFIP forces raided Japanese occupation forces in Mindanao and provided valuable intelligence to the Allied forces. For his military service before and during World War II, Dr. Montalvan received the following awards and decorations: Philippine Defense Medal; American Defense Medal; Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal, World War II Victory Medal; Philippine Republic Unit Citation Badge and the U.S. Distinguished Unit Badge. Following his polyneuritis, Dr. Montalvan reverted to inactive status on July 11, 1946 and was promoted to the rank of Major, Infantry Reserve in January 20, 1950.  “He suffered so much under the hands of the Japanese and often got slapped for no reason,” Ms. Montalvan said. “Many years later, that Japanese that put him under hard labor came back to Cagayan de Oro to apologize to him and to others he tortured. And my dad readily accepted his apology!” He resumed his duties as a professor of Spanish at the Ateneo in 1949 and took up law at the Cagayan Law School of the Ateneo, graduating with a degree of Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.) in 1953, passed the Bar exams and was admitted to the Bar in June 1954 and established a law practice. He married the former Mercedes Acero Roa of Cagayan de Oro City and with whom he had six children: Marrieta, Daisy, Annabel, Eduardo, Consuelo and Antonio. Dr. Montalvan passed away on September 21, 1978, his patriotism and service to the country and military apparently forgotten by the new generation of Kagay-anons. To rectify this situation, Rep. Rufus B. Rodriguez (2nd District, Cagayan de Oro) and Rep. Maximo B. Rodriguez, Jr. (Abante Mindanao- Party List) filed House Bill 4735 with the 15th Congress during its first regular session seeking to rename Camp Edilberto Evangelista to “Camp Jose Montalvan in honor of a Kagay-anon and Mindanaoan war hero who fought against the Japanese to protect the freedom of the Philippines.”  Camp Edilberto Evangelista in Barangay Patag, Cagayan de Oro City, is the largest military camp in Mindanao with an area of 129 hectares. It is the home base to the Philippine Army’s 4th Infantry Division and covers the Northern Mindanao and Caraga regions. The explanatory note to the HB 4735 reads in part: “It is readily apparent that Major Montalvan is a war hero who fought against the Japanese in order to ensure that the Philippines retain its independence. He gave up the best years of his life to fight for our country. It is therefore appropriate that he be honored by renaming Camp Evangelista into Camp Jose Montalvan, in honor of a Kagay-anon who risked his life for our country.”

    May 18, 2020

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  • Antonio Julian Montalvan: The Forgotten World War  II Martyr of Cagayan

    Antonio Julian Montalvan: The Forgotten World War II Martyr of Cagayan

    One of the perpendicular streets which links Burgos to Don Apolinar Velez streets in Cagayan de Oro City in the Philippines is named  Montalvan  but few of those traversing it or even living along it have any idea whom it is named after.     Antonio Julian Montalván y Corrales (Feb. 8, 1906 - Aug. 30, 1944) was a member of an espionage team working for the 10th  Military District under Col. Wendell W.  Fertig in Mindanao, who reported directly to Gen. Douglas MacArthur.      “He was a medical doctor, first assigned at the Misamis Provincial Hospital (now the Northern Mindanao Medical Center), then to Cebu, then Palompon in Leyte,” said his namesake and nephew local historian and columnist Antonio J. “Nono” Montalvan II. He later served as public health doctor in Iligan.     When the war began, he was the personal medic of Col. Wendell W. Fertig, head of the organized guerrilla resistance in Mindanao under the 10th Military District, United States Forces in the Philippines. He was recruited to serve as a spy by their cousin and brother-in-law Senator José Ozámiz, Nono added.     “He did intelligence work for Col Fertig,” said Nono’s brother Eduardo, who now serves as Board Chairman of the Cagayan de Oro City Water District (COWD). “Because of his familiarity with the UST Hospital, and as a Doctor, he was able to get information from patients on the movements of Japanese troops in Mindanao. The information he passed on to Col. Fertig was so vital in the guerrilla operations in  Mindanao.”     “He commuted to Manila from Mindanao by banca, going from one island to another. In one of his trips he was accompanied by Roque Ablan, Vicente Raval and Ferdinand Marcos (who was the most junior in the group) who were trying to get the assistance of the Mindanao Guerrilla Movement, “ Ed noted.     The group helped establish coastal radio relay stations in Mindanao, Visayas and Southern Luzon. Later, he became part of a Manila spy network.[1]     “His role was first to serve as courier between Manila and Mindanao. The boat would land in Pagbilao, Quezon which is just near Tayabas. Then he would proceed to Manila to get in touch with the Manila spy network (Spyron),” Nono relates.     “ He made 3 boat trips. He was about to make a 4th boat trip to Mindanao when he was captured in Tayabas. A carpenter who was doing work in the house squealed to the Japanese. He was brought to Fort Santiago, then to Bilibid,” he added.     Then newly married to Rosario Llamas, a cousin of Virginia Llamas Romulo, -- the first Mrs. Carlos P. Romulo—he was arrested by the Japanese Kempeitai in Tayabas town, in the house of his mother in-law Doña Tecla Capistrano Llamas. He was about to pack his bags for another clandestine boat trip to Mindanao.      The Japanese later detained and tortured him in Fort Santiago and at the Old Bilibid Prisons[1] in Manila.     On August 30, 1944 he was executed by decapitation with the group of Senator José Ozámiz, and the Elizalde Group of Manila which included the writer Rafael Roces and Blanche Walker Jurika, the mother in-law of guerilla leader Charles “Chick” Parsons.     The execution took place at the Manila Chinese Cemetery.     “They were executed together by decapitation. It was a large group -- about 40 of them,” Nono said. “There’s a war memorial for them at Manila North Cemetery.”     Philippine historian Ambeth Ocampo describes Montalván as a “World War II hero of Mindanao”.  (compiled by Mike Baños)

    May 18, 2020

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75th Cagayan Liberation Anniversary Feature: Maj. Jose Manuel Corrales Montalvan, 1st Camp Commander of the ‘Kampo’

May 18, 2020

Feature

By: Mike Baños, Few Kagay-anons today are aware that the first camp commander of the Philippine Army’s biggest military camp in Mindanao was a Lumad (native Kagay-anon).     Major Jose Manuel Corrales Montalvan was initially assigned as Cadre Commander of the 2nd Misamis Oriental (Machine Gun) Cadre at Camp Bulua (present day Camp Edilberto Evangelista) in Cagayan, a post he served in from January 1-Dec. 31, 1939.      When the camp was renamed Camp Evangelista, then 1st Lt. Montalvan was appointed its Camp Commander and Mobilization Center Officer on January 1, 1940, a post he served up to the outbreak of World War II.      Dr. Montalvan, who was also known as Ñor Peping, was born on March 17, 1903 in present day Cagayan de Oro (then known as Cagayan de Misamis, capital town of the Segundo Distrito de Misamis, and later as Misamis, Cagayan under the American regime) to Jose Gabriel Montalvan, a retired Spanish soldier from Belmonte, Cuenca, Spain who was assigned by the Spanish government to the Philippines and Concepcion Corrales y Roa of Cagayan de Misamis.      In 1927, he was graduated with honors (3rd highest) from the Philippine Dental College, Manila with a degree of Doctor in Dental Surgery (DDS).     Upon his return to his hometown in 1928, he practiced dentistry and became one of the first teachers of the Ateneo de Cagayan (present day Xavier University) and was its Commandant of the Corps of Cadets. Dr. Montalvan was commissioned a first lieutenant in the U.S. Army Reserve in 1928, was trained and successfully completed the U.S. Army Extension Courses. From 1933 to 1937 he was the instructor for Military Science and Tactics at the Ateneo de Cagayan. However, the lure of a full-time career in the newly formed Philippine Army proved irresistible and he resigned from the U.S. Army Reserve and was commissioned as a First Lieutenant, Infantry Reserve, of the Philippine Army on July 16, 1936. He was called to active duty training at Camp Murphy Training School for Reserve Officers (Infantry), assigned as Company Commander of the training officers company, and graduated No. 5 with a general average of 90.7% in 1938. While assigned as the first camp commander of Camp Evangelista, he graduated from the School of Military Law and Courts-Martial Procedure, Camp Keithley, Lanao in 1940. Upon his induction into the U.S. Army Forces – Far East (USAFFE) on September 6, 1941, he was appointed Division Finance Officer and Division Quartermaster of the USAFEE’s 102nd Division. Later, he was appointed Division Inspector General, 102nd Division, USAFFE, with Headquarters at Tankulan, Manolo Fortich, Bukidnon then promoted to Captain, Infantry, in April, 1942. Following the surrender of the USAFFE forces in Mindanao under Gen. William Sharp to the Japanese Imperial Army on May 10, 1942, Dr. Montalvan was taken as a prisoner-of-war (POW) by the Japanese and detained at the Ateneo de Cagayan campus which had been converted into a POW Camp. “During his captivity he developed polyneuritis, which caused his leg to become shorter, as a result of the hard labor he underwent in prison when he and others would carry sacks of potatoes and coffee under the rain, soaking their only clothing in their bodies,” recalls his daughter Annabel Montalvan Corrales. “One night after such experience his whole body became numb and his leg started to give him extreme pain. The doctors at that time did not know what it was but was later diagnosed as polyneuritis.” However, he successfully escaped and joined his family in Talakag, Bukidnon. He walked for days to Talakag, away from the road, because the Japanese were looking for him. Again, the rains came and soaked his clothes. When he got to Talakag he had very high fever and the polyneuritis he contracted became worse. He then proceeded to Misamis Occidental to join the guerrillas of Col. Wendell Fertig, commander of the United States Forces in the Philippines (USFIP) in Mindanao, which was made up of escaped prisoners-of-war and Filipino and American soldiers and civilians who refused to surrender to the Japanese. Between 1942 and 1944, USFIP forces raided Japanese occupation forces in Mindanao and provided valuable intelligence to the Allied forces. For his military service before and during World War II, Dr. Montalvan received the following awards and decorations: Philippine Defense Medal; American Defense Medal; Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal, World War II Victory Medal; Philippine Republic Unit Citation Badge and the U.S. Distinguished Unit Badge. Following his polyneuritis, Dr. Montalvan reverted to inactive status on July 11, 1946 and was promoted to the rank of Major, Infantry Reserve in January 20, 1950.  “He suffered so much under the hands of the Japanese and often got slapped for no reason,” Ms. Montalvan said. “Many years later, that Japanese that put him under hard labor came back to Cagayan de Oro to apologize to him and to others he tortured. And my dad readily accepted his apology!” He resumed his duties as a professor of Spanish at the Ateneo in 1949 and took up law at the Cagayan Law School of the Ateneo, graduating with a degree of Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.) in 1953, passed the Bar exams and was admitted to the Bar in June 1954 and established a law practice. He married the former Mercedes Acero Roa of Cagayan de Oro City and with whom he had six children: Marrieta, Daisy, Annabel, Eduardo, Consuelo and Antonio. Dr. Montalvan passed away on September 21, 1978, his patriotism and service to the country and military apparently forgotten by the new generation of Kagay-anons. To rectify this situation, Rep. Rufus B. Rodriguez (2nd District, Cagayan de Oro) and Rep. Maximo B. Rodriguez, Jr. (Abante Mindanao- Party List) filed House Bill 4735 with the 15th Congress during its first regular session seeking to rename Camp Edilberto Evangelista to “Camp Jose Montalvan in honor of a Kagay-anon and Mindanaoan war hero who fought against the Japanese to protect the freedom of the Philippines.”  Camp Edilberto Evangelista in Barangay Patag, Cagayan de Oro City, is the largest military camp in Mindanao with an area of 129 hectares. It is the home base to the Philippine Army’s 4th Infantry Division and covers the Northern Mindanao and Caraga regions. The explanatory note to the HB 4735 reads in part: “It is readily apparent that Major Montalvan is a war hero who fought against the Japanese in order to ensure that the Philippines retain its independence. He gave up the best years of his life to fight for our country. It is therefore appropriate that he be honored by renaming Camp Evangelista into Camp Jose Montalvan, in honor of a Kagay-anon who risked his life for our country.”

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Antonio Julian Montalvan: The Forgotten World War II Martyr of Cagayan

May 18, 2020

Feature

By: , One of the perpendicular streets which links Burgos to Don Apolinar Velez streets in Cagayan de Oro City in the Philippines is named  Montalvan  but few of those traversing it or even living along it have any idea whom it is named after.     Antonio Julian Montalván y Corrales (Feb. 8, 1906 - Aug. 30, 1944) was a member of an espionage team working for the 10th  Military District under Col. Wendell W.  Fertig in Mindanao, who reported directly to Gen. Douglas MacArthur.      “He was a medical doctor, first assigned at the Misamis Provincial Hospital (now the Northern Mindanao Medical Center), then to Cebu, then Palompon in Leyte,” said his namesake and nephew local historian and columnist Antonio J. “Nono” Montalvan II. He later served as public health doctor in Iligan.     When the war began, he was the personal medic of Col. Wendell W. Fertig, head of the organized guerrilla resistance in Mindanao under the 10th Military District, United States Forces in the Philippines. He was recruited to serve as a spy by their cousin and brother-in-law Senator José Ozámiz, Nono added.     “He did intelligence work for Col Fertig,” said Nono’s brother Eduardo, who now serves as Board Chairman of the Cagayan de Oro City Water District (COWD). “Because of his familiarity with the UST Hospital, and as a Doctor, he was able to get information from patients on the movements of Japanese troops in Mindanao. The information he passed on to Col. Fertig was so vital in the guerrilla operations in  Mindanao.”     “He commuted to Manila from Mindanao by banca, going from one island to another. In one of his trips he was accompanied by Roque Ablan, Vicente Raval and Ferdinand Marcos (who was the most junior in the group) who were trying to get the assistance of the Mindanao Guerrilla Movement, “ Ed noted.     The group helped establish coastal radio relay stations in Mindanao, Visayas and Southern Luzon. Later, he became part of a Manila spy network.[1]     “His role was first to serve as courier between Manila and Mindanao. The boat would land in Pagbilao, Quezon which is just near Tayabas. Then he would proceed to Manila to get in touch with the Manila spy network (Spyron),” Nono relates.     “ He made 3 boat trips. He was about to make a 4th boat trip to Mindanao when he was captured in Tayabas. A carpenter who was doing work in the house squealed to the Japanese. He was brought to Fort Santiago, then to Bilibid,” he added.     Then newly married to Rosario Llamas, a cousin of Virginia Llamas Romulo, -- the first Mrs. Carlos P. Romulo—he was arrested by the Japanese Kempeitai in Tayabas town, in the house of his mother in-law Doña Tecla Capistrano Llamas. He was about to pack his bags for another clandestine boat trip to Mindanao.      The Japanese later detained and tortured him in Fort Santiago and at the Old Bilibid Prisons[1] in Manila.     On August 30, 1944 he was executed by decapitation with the group of Senator José Ozámiz, and the Elizalde Group of Manila which included the writer Rafael Roces and Blanche Walker Jurika, the mother in-law of guerilla leader Charles “Chick” Parsons.     The execution took place at the Manila Chinese Cemetery.     “They were executed together by decapitation. It was a large group -- about 40 of them,” Nono said. “There’s a war memorial for them at Manila North Cemetery.”     Philippine historian Ambeth Ocampo describes Montalván as a “World War II hero of Mindanao”.  (compiled by Mike Baños)

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Au Revoir, Kuya Ken: Xavier Ateneo nursing alum in UK succumbs to COVID-19

May 10, 2020

Feature

By: , Kenneth Lambatan, a Xavier Ateneo nursing alumni (batch 2007), passed away Monday evening, April 27 at St George’s Hospital, United Kingdom, one of many frontline health workers worldwide to have lost their lives to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19).     Kenneth previously informed his family he was experiencing symptoms of the disease over a week after his assignment. Days later, the family learned about his condition from a close colleague. He had to be intubated and placed in the intensive care unit.     Their mother, Ludivina, read the Bible and sang gospel songs moments before Kenneth was taken off life support with his family virtually beside him. He was 33 years old     He is survived by his parents, Joy (older sister), Ezel (younger brother), nephews, and niece.     “For 18 days, he fought the greatest battle we could ever imagine” shared Ezel.     A Loving Son and Sibling      Kenneth’s journey is detailed by his brother, Ezel Lambatan in this Facebook post . Born second of three children, Kenneth was a bright boy with big dreams.     Ezel recalls how Kenneth, his ‘hero’, chose to take up nursing to please their mother. To help the family, Kenneth “made sure that Mama wouldn’t have difficulty sustaining him by securing a scholarship for 2 years.”     Seeking greener pastures, Kenneth was overjoyed when his visa to work in London was approved. He was able to support the education of his niece aside from providing for his family.     A Committed Health Worker     Kenneth was a dedicated public servant in Northern Mindanao Medical Center (NMMC) for eight years before becoming a cardiac research nurse at St George’s Hospital.     So it was no surprise when he was among those brave enough to respond to the call of healthcare frontliners in St George’s Hospital. Though his family was apprehensive, Kenneth heeded the nurses’ oath to his last breath.     In a post on their official Facebook page, the Xavier University Council of Nursing Students (XUCN) remembers their fallen alumni.     Xavier University - Ateneo de Cagayan extends her heartfelt prayers and condolences to Kenneth and his loved ones. May his soul rest in peace as we hope for the end of the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Stay Fit at Home with DTA, the Dynamic Training Approach

May 4, 2020

Feature

By: Coach Noel Villa, COVID-19 pandemic has definitely changed the way we live and do things. With the implementation of strict measures to contain the spread of the virus, our daily routine is now centered on the “new normal” which includes proper and frequent hand washing, wearing of face mask, staying at or working from home and physical distancing, among others.     Unless a vaccine for COVID-19 is developed and no new virus will infect mankind in pandemic proportions, this new normal will stay and all we can do at the least is to adjust, adapt and work around it.     Along with adapting to this new normal, we need to continue doing regular self-care to cushion the potential negative effects to our physical, emotional and psychological well-being.     One of the best ways to do this is to boost our immune system by eating healthy foods, drinking lots of water, getting at least 7-8 hours of sleep and doing regular exercise or physical activity.      There are myriad ways to get fit without the need to go to the gym so long as we don’t invent excuses to avoid exercising even when we have plenty of time spent at home.     To prove this, I developed some exercise programs using household items available to everyone: hand and kitchen towels.     In my new YouTube channel called Dynamic Training Approach DTA, I have uploaded a Towel Exercise series to teach his viewers easy to follow exercises using a hand towel and two kitchen towels.     I also shared a video on how to make your own exercise equipment, a DIY Towel Ball, which can be used as a substitute for regular gym equipment. Definitely no reason not to get fit despite being stuck at home!     I came up with this idea because some people are having a hard time to exercise without access to a gym or gym equipment, while some just don’t know how to start or continue their physical fitness activities due to the pandemic restrictions.      By subscribing for free to my YouTube channel, you can access simple and doable exercises that can be done using available tools or equipment within the comfort of your own home. I can also develop exercise programs for individual needs and provide personal training services via zoom or messenger if required by the subscriber. This way, I can continue helping people get fit and stay healthy to get through the new normal.     I have partnered with Odyssey Airport Express to help provide free shuttle service to Cagayan de Oro frontliners. For only P500.00, you can get free online consultation, two programs that you can do for the next 4 weeks plus 2 personal training sessions. 50% of the proceeds shall be donated to the free transportation program of Odyssey so our frontliners will not worry about getting to work and going home while the city is under general community quarantine.     I have done numerous fundraisers in the past which include a blood-drive, food, school supplies and book donations, including CSR activities through sports. I can’t pass up this opportunity to help our frontliners, through Odyssey Airport Express, using a platform for which I am passionate with, which is fitness. I hope that through this program, I can inspire others to be physically fit at home while helping our frontliners who do not have a choice but to go out and fight the virus for us. It’s a win-win scenario.”     Here’s the link to SUBSCRIBE to my YouTube channel and access free workout programs: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWrjdBSa3rMJ_U0B8vp6wug     To participate in the Free Shuttle Service for frontliners, please LIKE and send a message to my Facebook Page: www.facebook.com/dtaforfitness.     Special mention of thanks to Rea Liza Reyes, Raimi Yusof of Borneo Eagles RFC/Sandakan RFU, Eng. Rosello Bagundol, Teacher Val Cabigting of Happy Piano, Patrick Valor Rivera of Valor Training Center/USMF, Edna Mendoza & Miguel Villena.      (Coach Noel Villa is a UK-trained Personal Trainer based in Cagayan de Oro).

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IDC execs highlights CDO developments and environmental sustainability in estate industry

July 22, 2019

Billboard

By: , MANILA - Italpinas Development Corporation (IDCTM) Chairman & CEO, Architect Romolo V. Nati, together with IDC’s Director for Design and Construction, Engr. Giuseppe Garofalo, were invited at a sit-down interview at the PTV4’s headquarters last June 7, 2019 with the Philippines’ largest and most influential weekly business and news magazine, BizNewsAsia.      Hosted by Ms. Elizabeth Lee and Mr Tony Lopez, the founder, president, chairman and CEO of BizNewsAsia, the sit-down interview offered an opportunity to discuss with IDC’s guests about the rising trend and current condition of Philippine real estate industry.       Arch. Nati shared his insights on the topic, mentioning IDCTM as an example of a rising real estate development company, in different areas of the Philippines, emphasizing the importance of his company’s vision that is “creating design-driven sustainable developments in emerging cities, accessible to the new middle class”.      Alongside his vision, Arch. Nati shared the latest news regarding IDC’s eco-friendly developments being Primavera City, located uptown Cagayan de Oro in Northern Mindanao and the high-rise mixed use green buildings, Miramonti Green Residences, located in Sto. Tomas, Batangas.      Both the projects have been awarded as Best Mixed-use Development in the Philippines by Asia-Pacific International Property Awards which is a highly acclaimed award in the worldwide property industry.       Primavera City, that will future six mid-rise towers and a high rise tower, is going to be developed in 4 phases the first of which, Citta’ Verde is nearing completion and its phase 2 Citta’ Bella recently awarded a license to sell.  Arch. Nati said Primavera City’s Citta’ Bella will be followed by Citta’ Grande and by the 7th tallest tower, Citta’ Alta.      The construction of the first phase of Miramonti Green Residences, a 21 storey green building, strategically located in an Industrial park in Sto. Tomas, between Metro Manila and the port of Batangas City, is ongoing and the company is currently accelerating the process to obtain the required permits to start the second phase. This will be featuring other 2 buildings with same number of storey and adopting, as in all IDC’s projects, the best principles of passive building technology: shadow and sunlight control, wind cooling and shape performance.      Following this information, the interview then discussed the importance of eco-friendliness in construction and its appeal to possible tenants and future owners.       Arch. Nati ended his interview by sharing the news that Italpinas Development Corporation has filed a registration statement with the Securities and Exchange Commission for a share sale.       The offering involves up to 33.3 million preferred shares with an over-allotment of 10 million shares to be taken from the unissued authorized capital stock of the corporation at an offer price of P15 per share. At 43 million shares, the company could raise as much as P645 million.

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Allianz Sees Continuous Growth in Insurance Market in PH, Rest of Asia

July 21, 2019

Billboard

By: , While insurance penetration (premiums as a percentage of GDP) fell by 5.4% in Asia (ex-cluding Japan), the Philippines along with Vietnam, Laos, Sri Lanka, and India registered double-digit growths. This is according to the Allianz Global Insurance Report prepared by Allianz Research.      Allianz Research is projecting a 9.4% growth per annum over the next decade in Asia, ex-cluding Japan. Around 60% additional premiums are expected to be generated in the re-gion. In the Philippines, a market growth of 12.3% is foreseen (13.5 in life and 8.3 in p&c).       “Allianz’ strong performance in the Philippines reflects the country’s economic growth and strong macroeconomic fundamentals, and we are looking to leverage on the continuous ex-pansion of economic activity in the country,” said Alexander Grenz, newly appointed presi-dent and chief executive officer of Allianz PNB Life.      Premiums in the Philippines grew by 17.7% in 2018, way above the regional average. In fact, 2018 marked the best year since 2013. Life insurance, which accounts for more than 70% of the premium pool (without health), had a growth rate of 20.4%. It grew almost twice as fast as property-casualty (+11.1%).       For 2019, Allianz Research foresees a slowdown to around 10% premium growth, still well above regional or global averages. It noted that the Philippines’ insurance market has still plenty of room to grow: Premiums per capita stood at Php3,000.00 in 2018 (at par with neighboring Indonesia), penetration at 1.9%; it is, for example, already 3.7% in China. In-surance premiums in property-casualty and life are expected to grow by 14% this year and 12.3% over the next decade.      Allianz PNB Life is still the fastest-growing life insurance company in the Philippines, ac-cording to the report of the Insurance Commission. Its premium income grew by 69% in 2018 and its annualized premium income for 2018 stood at a historic high.      Grenz, who previously served as the chief operating officer of Allianz PNB Life, said that as today’s business environment goes through rapid changes, the company is hands-on to build a more diverse business model.      “We all know how fast-paced the insurance industry is; the pressure and expectations are high from all sides ‐ our customers, our investors, our regulators, and among ourselves. Late last year, for instance, we have seen changes in reserve requirements for banks to ad-dress the spike in inflation. This resulted in liquidity shortage in the Bancassurance indus-try. Even though we are still performing better compared to our competitors, we definitely need to catch up in the second half of the year,” Grenz said.      Grenz has more than 15 years of experience in global Insurance and Asset Management. He has a multinational track record in the areas of Finance, Insurance and Asset Manage-ment and has held various executive positions for Allianz in different countries.      As he heads Allianz PNB Life, Grenz said he plans to focus on simplifying insurance for the customers. “Simplification of insurance will be our priority. We will simplify the language of insurance to make it understandable to more customers and make it easy to access with the superior technology Allianz can provide,” he explained.       Grenz is, likewise, moving to tap Allianz’s global investment fund managers from PIMCO and Allianz Global Investments (AGI) to provide superior technical solutions and investment strategies.       “Our goal is to have a well-defined output that should create value for our customers. It’s the customers’ perception, which counts and defines our success. With PIMCO and AGI, cus-tomers are assured they have access to superior product solutions and technical advise,” he said.      Furthermore, Grenz is steering the company toward a digital future. Recently, the company opened its Allianz Digital Studio, which will pioneer the next-generation of innovation and solutions and make the delivery of insurance products and services faster and more effi-cient for both its internal and external customers.       “Our digital and customer-centric initiatives in the pipeline are geared toward enhancing the Allianz customer experience and differentiate us in the market,” he concluded.

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Globe supports athletes with cerebral palsy; helps nationwide search for pioneer players of CP Rascals

July 10, 2019

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By: , They may have physical challenges like cerebral palsy (CP) but the ailment was never a hindrance in bringing out the best in individuals who have big hearts and the passion to succeed, especially in sports like football.      “Sabi ng mga nanay na isama ko daw yung anak ko (sa football practice) at subukan lang. Tapos nagulat na lang ako na nasisipa niya yung bola. Hindi ko ine-expect na magagawa niya yun dahil di naman siya involved sa kahit anong sport dati. Sabi ko tuloy na dapat pala dati ko na siyang sinasali sa mga ganito (The mothers told me to bring my child and just try it out. I was surprised that my child can kick the ball. I didn’t expect that he can do it because he was never involved in any sport before. I realized that I should have brought my child before to this kind of activity),” said Marinela S. Kaabay whose eldest child Kenneth has cerebral palsy among other disabilities. The activity Kaabay referred to was the 1st CP Football Day where kids with cerebral palsy from Metro Manila and nearby provinces gathered for a friendly game of football at the La Salle Greenhills in Mandaluyong City. Around 50 CP individuals, including Kaabay’s child and four others from her area, ran and kicked the elusive ball to their hearts’ content despite the scorching afternoon heat.      The 1st CP Football Day is just one of the efforts to have more children with CP get into sports. It received a big boost when Globe Telecom entered into a partnership with the Henry V. Moran Foundation, the Philippine Sports Association of the Differently Abled (PHILSPADA), and CP Football Philippines, the prime movers of CP football in the country.      Globe gave the foundation and its beneficiaries the much-needed communications platform to reach individuals with CP who live in various parts of the country who may be interested in football. The program also complements Globe Telecom’s “TM Sports Para sa Bayan,” a long-term program that helps kids develop and grow in a sport that they love.      “We want to use the power of sports to make a difference in the lives of individuals especially those who belong to the marginalized sectors of society.  Over the past several years, Globe has gone beyond business by offering basketball and football development programs to underprivileged kids.  This time, we want to extend our support to individuals with cerebral palsy and help them pursue their dreams,” said Miguel Bermundo, Head of Globe Citizenship and Advocacy.      CP Football is similar to a regular football game but the rules were tweaked to make the sport more attractive, accessible and fit for those with cerebral palsy and other neurological conditions. The playing field is smaller and game time lasts for one hour with a 15-minute half-time break.      Aside from having fun, the 1st CP Football Day also saw the formal introduction of CP football in the Philippines as well as the search for CP individuals with the potential to become members of the “CP Rascals,” the team that will represent the Philippines in the 2022 Asian Para Games.      To support the search as well as the training, living expenses and other needs of the players, interested groups and individuals may send their donation to the following: Account Name: The Henry V. Moran Foundation, Inc. Account Number: 2251-0005-33 Bank Name: Bank of the Philippine Islands Bank Address: Greenhills Missouri Branch Missouri cor. Nevada Sts. North-East Greenhills, San Juan, Metro Manila Swift Code: BOPIPHMM      Dr. Anna Raganathan, Consultant Psychologist and Board Member of the International Federation of CP Football, said that based on research, individuals with cerebral palsy who have consistent exercise can recover to become almost normal. “Even when they get physical therapy already, the addition of sports can make them stronger and help them avoid injuries because they get to develop their bones and muscles.”      She also told the parents that they don’t have to worry if their kids are still too young or won’t be selected as a member of CP Rascals. The program will continue even after the first team is already formed and it will even become the training ground of CP individuals who want to start young. “It’s about time that everyone should look at the abilities of individuals with cerebral palsy rather than their disabilities,” Dr. Raganathan added.      It was, perhaps, a tiring afternoon for the kids who sweated it out via football together with their cheering parents and supporters. But other than the sweat and the exhausting physical efforts exerted by the kids to play football, Dr. Raganathan emphasized that aside from having the right to play sports, more importantly, CP kids also have the right to have fun.      To know about Globe Telecom’s sustainability programs, please visit:   link https://www.globe.com.ph/about-us/sustainability and https://www.facebook.com/GlobeBridgeCom/

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ADB Development Asia features Romolo Nati as Expert in Sustainable Design

July 7, 2019

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By: , Italpinas Development Corporation (IDC) Chairman and CEO, Architect Romolo V. Nati sheds light on the importance of Sustainable Design in real estate.  Arch. Nati, an expert in green architecture, emphasized the advantages of developing sustainable buildings for emerging cities.  Nati cited the importance of sustainable development and climate resiliency in the real estate sector, and the need to integrate sustainable features in the design framework of resilient buildings in an article featured by Development.Asia by the Asian Development Bank (ADB).      Development.Asia is a knowledge collaboration platform for sharing and promoting expertise, best practice and technology related to the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals. Nati has been chosen as one of the few industry Expert in the country, sharing solutions in Sustainable Design. (Know more about article at https://development.asia/explainer/why-real-estate-investors-must-adopt-sustainable-design)       Philippines can be a role model for sustainable development in Asia. Architect Nati believes that sustainable design will reap the most benefit in the country. Architect Nati applies nature-based design, known as biomimicry – a concept that emulates the process, systems, and strategies present in nature – to his projects. And uses an advanced design technology called parametric software that allows the designer to factor in local conditions so that the building orientation, shape, and features are maximized for natural ventilation and natural light. Each design is unique and adapted to a specific location and project.       IDC has marked its legacy as the first green mover in Cagayan de Oro with its flagship project, Primavera Residences. With the passion to further strengthen its green advocacies in the city, IDC pursued to showcase its green initiative with its latest development, Primavera City. And further expanding in Sto. Tomas, Batangas with its project, Miramonti Green Residences.  All three developments of IDC had been awarded by the prestigious International Property Awards-Asia Pacific. Its latest development, Miramonti Green Residences received the citation in the Best Mixed-Use Development category in the International Property Awards-Asia Pacific 2019-2020. While IDC’s first two projects, Primavera Residences and Primavera City, both located in Cagayan de Oro, are recipient of the same category with  Primavera Residences winning recognition in 2015, and  Primavera City winning the award in 2017.

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